Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 26986 times)

Adam_Autist

  • I am worth 100 points in GURPS...ladies
  • ***
  • Posts: 191
    • View Profile
    • Niche Comics
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #300 on: February 12, 2017, 08:01:22 PM »
www.dccomics.com/comics/the-wild-storm-2017/the-wild-storm-1

http://comicsalliance.com/dc-wildstorm-warren-ellis-pop-up-imprint/

Don't know if this goes here but I have been obsessing over the the character designs for the Wildstorm superhero universe reboot by Warren Ellis The Wild Storm.

Also I'm about half way through my second reading of planetary.

Edit: On a more highbrow note Audible informs me that John Darnielle book is out too.
« Last Edit: February 12, 2017, 08:12:58 PM by Adam_Autist »

TRNSHMN

  • Slayer of the Dread Gazebo
  • *
  • Posts: 29
  • Even less impressive IRL
    • View Profile
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #301 on: March 01, 2017, 06:14:06 AM »
Just finished Big Machine last night. Have mixed feelings about it. Some parts I was completely sucked in by, others I appreciated on a more distant level, but the core plot was somewhat...thin, I guess? And a lot of build-up for not too much, and a vague ending. The semi-autobiographical nature shows, because the parts inspired by real life are much more powerful, while the the rest feel less thought through. Overall, worth a read, but not going in my favorites.

Anyone got an interesting recent urban fantasy/horror recommendation?

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
    • View Profile
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #302 on: March 12, 2017, 07:05:47 PM »
Couple of books I've recently read:

Sarah Hyndman's Why Fonts Matter, a book about fonts directed at the general public rather than graphic designers.  Hyndman looks at peoples' emotional responses to fonts, using the language of feeling, taste, texture, sound, etc. to describe fonts.  It's an accessible book for "font consumers" to think about how they interact with the fonts that typically surround them every day; and for graphic designers, a useful exercise in walking in the shoes of the general public.

Juan Williams' Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965, the companion book for a 1980's PBS documentary of the same name.  Williams looks at a specific and rather monumental period in the American civil rights movement, from the Brown v. the Board of Education case to the passage of the Voting Rights Act.  I was broadly familiar with the history before reading this book, but getting the details laid out in chronological order was quite helpful.  And it was rather ironic --today-- to be reading a book about the American civil rights movement that ends with the signing of the Voting Rights Act.

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
    • View Profile
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #303 on: March 12, 2017, 07:55:39 PM »
IQ and the medical model basically save my life.

I am very seriously dyslexic.

Having a metric like IQ that can be broken down internally, meant that educational psychologists where able to demonstrate that I was not just dumb.

Being able to say look there very significant difference between his actual IQ and the IQ he would have if his reading and writing skills sat at the same level as the rest of the elements that make up IQ.

That evidence  forced the local education authority to pay for special needs schooling, which is basically the only reason we can have this little chat.

IQ is a useful tool.   

Well, again, that sort of testing is not what Gould was arguing against.  Gould was very much in favour of educators identifying students who need help, and getting them the help they need.  What The Mismeasure of Man argues against is the idea that a person's intellectual worth can be measured with a single number (called "I.Q.", "General Intelligence" & "G" by various people) and that that number is inherent and not affected by environment or educational circumstances.  This concept of intelligence has been, and continues to be, used to dismiss individuals and groups of people as inherently "unintelligent" and undeserving of the basic opportunities to succeed that others are granted without question.

Here's another example of the inequities that this concept of "intelligence" has been used to justify:  For decades in Britain, children were tested at the age of 11 for "General Intelligence" and on the results of those tests they were sent on to either grammar school (to prepare them for a university), technical school (to learn a trade) or modern school (to prepare for a life in the service industry).  The grammar schools received more funding per student than the other schools, and their students typically went on the university and much more prestigious, high-paying jobs.  Trade & modern school students weren't offered the classes required for university entrance, and had to work harder than grammar school students to get into university.  In addition, when the baby boom generation began to enter secondary schools, the requirements to enter grammar school were raised in order to keep budgets down, increasing the inequity of the British education system.

Now, under that sort of regime, how do you think you would have fared?  Do you think that you would have gotten the help you needed? or do you think you would have been told that you were "just dumb" and sent on to a life in the trades or service industry?

constructacon

  • Slayer of the Dread Gazebo
  • *
  • Posts: 48
    • View Profile
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #304 on: March 15, 2017, 04:12:50 AM »
i just finished listening to Super Powered on Audible, it's a great superhero inspired game that gets you thinking about the side effects and other sides of being someone with powers. it's got a large cast of main characters so be prepared for that but all in all if your running anything with superpowers its good fodder for ideas in addition to being an all around good book. anywho buring the lead here, i found out that it started life as a web novel so i thought i would share the link here for all to enjoy.

http://www.drewhayesnovels.com/superpowereds/

clockworkjoe

  • BUY MY BOOK
  • Administrator
  • Extreme XP CEO
  • *****
  • Posts: 6456
    • View Profile
    • BUY MY BOOK
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #305 on: March 16, 2017, 02:47:01 AM »
Working my way through Universal Harvester So far, so good.

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 311
    • View Profile
Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #306 on: March 19, 2017, 05:11:24 PM »
Sarah Hyndman's Why Fonts Matter, a book about fonts directed at the general public rather than graphic designers.  Hyndman looks at peoples' emotional responses to fonts, using the language of feeling, taste, texture, sound, etc. to describe fonts.  It's an accessible book for "font consumers" to think about how they interact with the fonts that typically surround them every day; and for graphic designers, a useful exercise in walking in the shoes of the general public.

Oh, and I've got a bit of a font anecdote:  Hyndman talked about the fonts on consumer products a lot, and their role in conveying the product's identity and invoking feelings in consumers.  In the late seventies, Canada's biggest grocery store chain decided to create a line of low-price, generic, "non-brand" products in response to consumer complaints about rising food prices.  The brand was called "no name" and featured very simple packaging that went against the consumer product design trends of the time: plain yellow packages with black, lowercase lettering for the product name.  And the font? Helvetica, of course.  Within a decade of it's launch, no name became the most popular brand of groceries and household products in Canada.  The line was recently re-launched with a return to the original packaging style in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis, and I realized while I was reading Hyndman's book that a lot of the products in my kitchen are no name brand.