Author Topic: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin  (Read 253442 times)

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #15 on: February 25, 2015, 02:56:51 PM »
Evidently you can find bomb shelters/terrorist holes anywhere.

http://wshu.org/post/toronto-police-try-uncover-riddle-mystery-tunnel

Quote
During a news conference Tuesday, Toronto Deputy Police Chief Mark Saunders said the hand-dug tunnel is about 33 feet long and contained a gas-powered generator, moisture-resistant light bulbs, and food and beverage containers.

Saunders said the tunnel appeared to be well-constructed and that there were still tools inside, along with a wheelbarrow and a pulley system, when it was found. Police also found a rosary and a Remembrance Day poppy nailed to a wall.

But Saunders said the tunnel doesn't appear to go anywhere. There are questions about whether it was just unfinished or was it meant to be a single chamber.

This proto-bunker was found by the tennis courts at York University.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-31609167

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 408
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2015, 07:45:30 PM »
Evidently you can find bomb shelters/terrorist holes anywhere.

http://wshu.org/post/toronto-police-try-uncover-riddle-mystery-tunnel

Quote
During a news conference Tuesday, Toronto Deputy Police Chief Mark Saunders said the hand-dug tunnel is about 33 feet long and contained a gas-powered generator, moisture-resistant light bulbs, and food and beverage containers.

Saunders said the tunnel appeared to be well-constructed and that there were still tools inside, along with a wheelbarrow and a pulley system, when it was found. Police also found a rosary and a Remembrance Day poppy nailed to a wall.

But Saunders said the tunnel doesn't appear to go anywhere. There are questions about whether it was just unfinished or was it meant to be a single chamber.

This proto-bunker was found by the tennis courts at York University.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-31609167
There's more photos (and maps!) here: http://www.blogto.com/city/2015/02/toronto_tunnel_mystery_gets_even_more_bizarre/

Ghoul's nest?  Urban survivalists?

...homeless people?
CADmonkey: G+; Tumblr
Yo Dawg, I Heard You Like Mecha: G+; Tumblr

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 408
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2015, 07:50:04 PM »
Oh, and speaking of bomb shelters in Toronto:

Welcome to your private nuclear fallout shelter

Quote
In 1959, the builders of Regency Acres, a 700-home subdivision in Aurora, Ontario, offered something no other homebuilder in the country could: a private, family-sized nuclear fallout shelter.
CADmonkey: G+; Tumblr
Yo Dawg, I Heard You Like Mecha: G+; Tumblr

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #18 on: March 26, 2015, 09:22:56 PM »
In October 2010, Nature published a collection of news stories and comments on cities. Some of these may be useful for Ruin.

http://www.nature.com/news/specials/cities/index.html

On the latest GDW podcast (iirc) Ross said his focus on architectural horror was to invert an idea of architecture, namely that instead of humans shaping buildings to work optimally for their lifestyles; what if buildings shaped humans to function optimally for theirs?

So I skimmed a couple articles that peaked my interest with an eye for ideas that would fit Ross's theme.

Both of these articles are two pages.

A Unified Theory of Urban Living

Link: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v467/n7318/full/467912a.html

Uploaded pdf:  http://www.docdroid.net/voa9/unified-theory-of-urban-living-comment.pdf.html

Overall, Bettencourt and West suggest that cities have measurable universal features; and according to their mathematical model, cities are approximately scaled models of each other. Also, they claim that. income, crime and patents (as a metric for novel ideas) scale the same way with population size.

Now starting with the title "A unified theory of urban living", I immediately thought of the Delta Green scenario The Last Equation.  What if there was a unified mathematical theory for the development of a "perfect" city. Would the equation drive the architect mad? Or could literal knowledge of the equation be a metaphysical gate into the Ur-City (Carcosa, naturally) which would suck the players into that nightmare realm if they were around the discoverer at the time of revelation?  Or say the discoverer is insane, but his knowledge of the Perfect City equation allows him to teleport around a city or even around the world committing ritualistic crimes.  Or instead of an architect who discovers this, maybe a mathematician who tries to optimize traffic discovers it.

Quote
But cities supply solutions as well as
problems, as they are the world’s centres of
creativity, power and wealth. So the need is
urgent for an integrated, quantitative, predictive,
science-based understanding of the
dynamics, growth and organization of cities.
To combat the multiple threats facing
humanity, a ‘grand unified theory of sustainability’
with cities and urbanization at its core must be
 developed. Such an ambitious
programme requires major international
commitment and dedicated transdisciplinary
collaboration across science, economics
and technology, including business leaders
and practitioners, such as planners and
designers.
Developing a predictive framework
applicable to cities around the world
is a daunting task, given their extraordinary
complexity and diversity. However, we
are strongly encouraged that this might
be possible.

There's the members of your "perfect city" cult right there.

Quote
Universal features

Cities manifest remarkably universal, quantifiable
features. This is shown by new analyses
of large urban data sets, spanning several
decades and hundreds of urban centres in
regions and countries around the world
from the United States and Europe to China
and Brazil4,5. Surprisingly, size is the major
determinant of most characteristics of a city;
history, geography and design have secondary
roles4,6.

Three main characteristics vary systematically
with population. One, the space
required per capita shrinks, thanks to
denser settlement and a more intense use
of infrastructure. Two, the pace of all socioeconomic
activity accelerates, leading to
higher productivity. And three, economic
and social activities diversify and become
more interdependent, resulting in new
forms of economic specialization and cultural
expression.

We have recently shown that these general
trends can be expressed as simple mathematical
‘laws’. For example, doubling the
population of any city requires only about
an 85% increase in infrastructure, whether
that be total road surface, length of electrical
cables, water pipes or number of petrol stations4.

This systematic 15% savings happens
because, in general, creating and operating
the same infrastructure at higher densities
is more efficient, more economically viable,
and often leads to higher-quality services
and solutions that are impossible in smaller
places. Interestingly, there are similar savings
in carbon footprints7,8 — most large, developed
cities are ‘greener’ than their national
average in terms of per capita carbon emissions.

It is as yet unclear whether this is also
true for cities undergoing extremely rapid
development, as in China or India, where
data are poor or lacking.

Similar economies of scale are found in
organisms and communities like anthills
and beehives, where the savings are closer
to 20%. Such regularities originate in the
mathematical properties of the multiple
networks that sustain life, from the cardiovascular
to the intracellular9. This suggests
that similar network dynamics underlie
economies of scale in cities.

Cities, however, are much more than giant
organisms or anthills: they rely on longrange,
complex exchanges of people, goods
and knowledge. They are invariably magnets
for creative and innovative individuals, and
stimulants for economic growth, wealth
production and new ideas — none of which
have analogues in biology.

Naturally this brings to mind sentient cities that convert humans partially into fleshy biomass to fuel their growth, or converting humans into insect like drones.  Something very similar to the July Park scenario.

Quote
The bigger the city, the more the average
citizen owns, produces and consumes,
whether goods, resources or ideas4. On average,
as city size increases, per capita
socio-economic quantities such as
wages, GDP, number of patents produced
and number of educational
and research institutions all increase
by approximately 15% more than the
expected linear growth4. There is,
however, a dark side: negative metrics
including crime, traffic congestion
and incidence of certain diseases
all increase following the same 15%
rule4. The good, the bad and the ugly
come as an integrated, predictable,
package.

Our work shows that, despite
appearances, cities are approximately
scaled versions of one another (see
graph): New York and Tokyo are, to
a surprising and predictable degree,
nonlinearly scaled-up versions of San Francisco
in California or Nagoya in Japan. These
extraordinary regularities open a window on
underlying mechanism, dynamics and structure
common to all cities.

Taking these ideas and the figure in the paper, what if there was a philanthropic cult that wanted to promote the growth of their city to the next level, and the linear relationship between crime, income and patents could actually drive the population growth of the city supernaturally if they increased? So the cult goes around by day promoting business growth and funding start ups and awarding culture (ideas) but at night they have to drive up the crime as well (literally murder rate was used as a metric for crime in the figure) so they engage directly or have catspaws that carry out ritual murder?  Of course this brings to mind the mythology surrounding Jack the Ripper and the graphic novel From Hell.

Quote
In biology, the network principles underlying
economies of scale have two profound
consequences. They constrain both the pace
of life (big mammals live longer, evolve slower,
and have slower heart rates, all to the same
degree9), and the limits of growth (animals
generally reach a stable size at maturity10). In
contrast, cities are driven by social interactions
whose feedback mechanisms lead to
the opposite behaviour. The pace of urban life
systematically increases with each expansion
of population size: diseases spread faster,
businesses are born and die more often and
people even walk faster in larger cities, all by
approximately the same 15% rule4. Moreover,
this social network dynamic allows the
growth of cities to be unbounded: continuous
adaptation, not equilibrium, is the rule.

So who is influencing who here really.

Quote
Our research shows that cities are remarkably
robust: success, once achieved, is sustained
for several decades or longer6, thereby
setting a city on a long run of creativity and
prosperity. A great example of success is
metropolitan San Jose, home to the Silicon
Valley, which has been consistently overperforming
relative to expectations for its size
for at least 50 years, well before the advent of
modern hi-tech industry.

This could be straight from the manifesto of a city cultist.

Bettencourt and West have collaborated on a number of other interesting city papers: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=Bettencourt+West


Synthetic Biology: Living Quarters

Link: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v467/n7318/full/467916a.html

Uploaded pdf: http://www.docdroid.net/voj3/synthetic-biology-buildings.pdf.html

Since Carcosa may feature buildings of the future (or alternate futures?) this article may be of some use.

"Synthetic Biology" has a variety of definitions depending on the field that is using the term. In this paper, "Synthetic Biology" covers the canonical definition of highly bioengineered organisms, chemical synthesis of biological products, and self assembling materials which in other contexts is referred to as "nanotechnology".

Quote
Architects have long drawn inspiration from the forms and functions of natural systems. Yet biological cells and organisms have requirements — such as nutrition and growth-support structures — that limit their use in construction. Synthetic biology offers new ways to combine the advantages of living systems with the robustness of traditional materials to produce genuinely sustainable and environmentally responsive architecture.
...
Strategies will be required to achieve 'carbon negative' buildings, including innovative retrofitting, energy harvesting, recycling of materials and the use of elements that interact with and respond directly to the environment. Chemically active interfaces could alter microclimates around surfaces and act as 'environmental pharmaceuticals'. For example, coatings could absorb carbon dioxide on building surfaces, adsorb pollutants or trap dust particles electrostatically.
...
Researchers are developing promising examples of biological systems that can fulfil architectural functions. Bacteria commonly found in the environment — such as Micrococcus, Staphylococcus, Bacillus and Pseudomonas species that also linger in air — may be adapted for use as biosensors. A new centre at the University of Oregon in Eugene plans to coordinate research that links architecture and microorganisms, both existing and designed. The university's Biology and the Built Environment (BioBE) Center, awarded funding this summer from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation in New York, will investigate the 'microbiome of the built environment' — the complex bacterial ecosystems that occur within buildings and their interactions with humans and the environment. Such relationships are important, for example, for maintaining indoor air quality.

Species of another airborne bacterium, Brevundimonas, show promise as an indicator of indoor pollutants: some can metabolize toxins such as arsenic, and could be genetically modified to change colour in the presence of a range of heavy metals. Other types of bacteria might be grown decoratively on walls or roofs to signal levels of harmful pollutants in cities. For example, undergraduates from the University of Cambridge, UK, engineered the bacterium Escherichia coli to change hue in the presence of an inducer, a system that could be adapted to detect heavy metals. This was just one of many pioneering entries in the 2009 International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) synthetic-biology competition at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge.
...
Innovative forms of lighting that use bioluminescent bacteria are being investigated by microbiologist Simon Park at the University of Surrey in Guildford, UK. In 2009, with artist Anne Brodie, he demonstrated a photographic booth that takes portraits using the ethereal light generated by Photobacterium phosphoreum. A glowing Christmas tree produced in 2007 by biologist Edward Quinto of the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, using bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri bacteria from the guts of squid, raises the possibility of using luminous trees for street lighting.

Biological structures can inspire entirely new construction methods and materials. Terreform One, an interdisciplinary architectural design practice in New York, has envisaged growing a leathery skin for covering buildings, dubbed 'Meat House'. By transforming pig cells and using large-scale three-dimensional printing techniques to establish the structural framework, the skin would be grown to the required shape and size and then fixed with preservatives. Its biodegradable nature would avoid the need for later demolition. The technique is prohibitively expensive — around US$1,000 for three square centimetres of skin — but it demonstrates the alternative approaches offered by synthetic-biology techniques.

As a note "Meat House" predates Eclipse Phase's Meat Hab by at least a couple of years :D.

Quote
The pressing environmental problems of Venice are amenable to some synthetic-biology solutions. Our installation entitled Hylozoic Ground, displayed at the Canadian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2010 and created with architect Philip Beesley from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, showcased the recycling of carbon dioxide exhaled by visitors into solid carbonate using protocell technology. Similar deposits could stabilize the city's foundations by growing an artificial limestone reef beneath it.

Ideas galore here. All sorts of nasty thoughts and body horror opportunities arise when thinking about sentient buildings that convert humans for biosensor use.  The images of hell in Barlowe's Inferno
would be very appropriate.

 http://www.amazon.com/Barlowes-Inferno-Wayne-Barlowe/dp/1883398363

Hope this has stirred some ideas!
« Last Edit: March 26, 2015, 09:40:47 PM by Twisting H »

Morbid

  • Slayer of the Dread Gazebo
  • *
  • Posts: 43
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #19 on: April 03, 2015, 05:24:59 PM »
http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150402-the-worst-place-on-earth

I found this article today, which immediately reminded me of some Carcosa-esque imagery.  It even comes with a version of Hali:

Quote
From where I'm standing, the city-sized Baogang Steel and Rare Earth complex dominates the horizon, its endless cooling towers and chimneys reaching up into grey, washed-out sky. Between it and me, stretching into the distance, lies an artificial lake filled with a black, barely-liquid, toxic sludge.

and

Quote
At times it’s impossible to tell where the vast structure of the Baogang refineries complex ends and the city begins. Massive pipes erupt from the ground and run along roadways and sidewalks, arching into the air to cross roads like bridges.
 


There's also that potential feeling like in Twisting H's post that the environment - the sprawling network of factories, refineries, and pipes - may be more in control than the humans involved. 

Quote
Amongst the mazes of pipes, tanks, and centrifuges, there are no people. In fact there’s no activity at all. Apart from our voices, which echo through the huge sheds, the plant is silent. It’s very obviously not operating. When asked, our guide tells us the plant is closed for maintenance – but there’s no sign of that either: no maintenance crews, no cleaning or repairs being done. When pushed further our guide gets suspicious, wonders why we are asking so many questions, and clams up. It’s a behaviour we’ll encounter a lot in Baotou – a refusal to answer questions or stray off a strictly worded script.

While there's a simple human explanation - the guide isn't kept in the loop or willing to say things that can be held against him - it's also easy to map a more otherworldly explanation for gaming.  Of course the plant isn't working right now.  It doesn't want to.  When it wants to work, there will be people inside again; to question this is absurd.

There's also a certain Repairer of Reputations quality to it, but that's more down to the economics than anything else.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 05:26:36 PM by Morbid »

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #20 on: April 22, 2015, 08:53:13 PM »
More creepy locations and Urban Ex.

From Wired in 2014, photos from the "closed cities" of Soviet nuclear testing areas:



http://www.wired.com/2014/10/photos-ruins-ussrs-secret-nuclear-cities/

Evidently there is a iOS app of the photos.

----

UrbEx of abandoned NYC locations. Perfect for ghoul locations.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/20/travel/creepy-abandoned-nyc/

The room in the psychiatric building covered with decades worth of pigeon droppings is just creepy.



« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 11:24:48 PM by Twisting H »

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2015, 11:41:53 PM »
China's Ghost Shopping Mall is apparently being slowly repopulated.

http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/28/asia/china-ghost-mall-return-to-life/

More on the ghost shopping mall.

2013 report: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zPkm2SU1DM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_South_China_Mall

There are some fantastic haunting images on google image search.





----------

A 2008 report in Popular Science detailed one group of scientists idea to transplant farms into skyscrapers to solve the future's demand for food.

http://www.popsci.com/cliff-kuang/article/2008-09/farming-sky

Quote
By 2025, the world's population will swell from 6.6 billion to 8 billion people. Climate simulations predict sustained drought for the American Midwest and giant swathes of farmland in Africa and Asia. Is mathematician Thomas Malthus's 200-year-old prediction, that human growth will one day outpace agriculture, finally coming to pass? Advances in farming technology have kept us fed so far, but the planet's resources are tapped.

The choice is clear—rethink how we grow food, or starve. Environmental scientist Dickson Despommier of Columbia University and other scientists propose a radical solution: Transplant farms into city skyscrapers. These towers would use soil-free hydroponic farming to slash demand for energy (they'll be powered by a process that converts sewage into electricity) while producing more food. Farming skyward would also free up farmland for trees, which would help remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Even better, vertical farms would grow food near where it would be eaten, thus cutting not only the cost but the emissions of transportation. If you include emissions from the oil burned to cultivate and ship crops and livestock in addition to, yes, methane from farm-animal flatulence, agriculture churns out nearly 14 percent of the world's greenhouse-gas emissions.

You can't buy vertically grown groceries just yet. Most urban farming efforts have been small-scale experiments run in neighborhood parks. Despommier's vision is bigger: a $200-million, 30-story tower covering an entire city block, stuffed with enough fruit, vegetables and chickens to feed 50,000 people. "With waste in and food out, a vertical farm would be like a perpetual-motion machine that feeds a lot of people," he says. Most of the technology already exists, he adds, and with some refining, the project could be up and running quickly if granted 0.25 percent of the subsidies paid to American farmers in the past decade—a piddling $500 million.

Using sewage to run the farm



A model of a hydroponics/fish farm merge



If we are running with Ross's central conceit of Ruin, that the building shape the inhabitants for their purposes, what would a skyscraper purpose build to be a farm do it its inhabitants?  If your purpose is a food source, you do need someone to consume it.   ;D



Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #22 on: May 18, 2015, 10:32:23 PM »
I have heard the urban legend of crocodiles in the sewer and mutants/homeless in the sewer but never pigs in the sewer.

Ripped from the Something Awful Bloodborne thread.

Quote from: 'sector_corrector'
I've been watching a series on Netflix called "Filthy Cities", which is a pop-history approach to sanitation and modernization in major cities, usually taking a long-term approach that spans several decades or centuries. Anyway, the sort of filth and deprivation they describe makes me realize just how well realized Yarnham is realized in terms of history and aesthetic, and how the story and art direction teams did a great job of making a very complete feeling world with a lot of stuff likely grounded in our own history and folklore. One example is how pre-modern London had a feral pig problem, where people kept pigs as cheap sources of protein, but they would often escape and become wild, eating crops, produce, and being a general nuisance. People were paid to hunt down the pest pigs, who often made their homes in the sewers. It makes me appreciate it every time I Kirkhammer a giant boar in a sewer somewhere.

http://www.strangehistory.net/2010/06/07/victorian-sewer-pigs/

I recommend it as a companion if you're playing through right now.

I've never heard of Filthy Cities before, but it might be useful for Ruin or general city worldbuilding.

BBC Two link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00z8r9l

Youtube Filthy Cities Industrial New York: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlUzD9YpaPw

Youtube Filthy Cities Medieval London:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4j1kG4HswY


trinite

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 474
    • View Profile
    • Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #23 on: May 19, 2015, 02:27:24 PM »
Twisting H: I had some professors in college who tried to set up a fish farm/hydroponic tomato operation in their basement. They ended up with fish overpopulation, which led to the poop clogging up the hydroponics and the collapse of the whole system.

For Ruin, maybe the human inhabitants of the skyscraper become elements of the self-sustaining biocycle. They eat the fish and plants, but they in turn need to become into food for something else, to keep the cycle running. Perhaps the building begins adding additional layers of predation, attempting to complete a totally self-sustaining cycle...
Check out the Technical Difficulties Gaming Podcast!
http://www.technicaldifficultiespod.com/

Teapot

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 264
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #24 on: June 13, 2015, 06:22:39 AM »
Brutalist playgrounds because what could be more playful than concrete?
http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/jun/09/britains-brutalist-playgrounds-in-pictures

CADmonkey

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 408
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2015, 10:31:08 PM »
Glimpse the Absurd Parisian Ghost Town in the Middle of China

https://vimeo.com/57895709

Quote
Despite China's well-documented love for all things French, the ambitious development hasn't translated into success for the developers hoping to cash in on China's aspirational European tastes. Surrounded by a confusing mix of farmland and wide, abruptly ending roads, Tianducheng is now considered by local media to be a ghost town, its population well short of the 10,000 it can support.
CADmonkey: G+; Tumblr
Yo Dawg, I Heard You Like Mecha: G+; Tumblr

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2015, 11:30:36 PM »
Something Awful GBS architecture thread. Featuring! The magic of Brutalism!

http://forums.somethingawful.com/showthread.php?threadid=3701638&userid=0&perpage=40&pagenumber=1


Reflected light from London skyscraper melts car. 2013 news story from CNN about London's 'Walkie Talkie' building.

http://www.cnn.com/2013/09/03/world/europe/uk-london-building-melts-car/

Ten luxury hotels with history

http://www.cnn.com/2015/05/17/travel/world-most-iconic-hotels/

Abandoned movie sets!

http://www.clipd.com/movies/10049/18-eerie-and-awesome-abandoned-movie-sets#slide/0

Mecca to soon hold the world's largest hotel

Twelve towers, 10,000 rooms and 70 restaurants, plus helipads and a full-size convention center: That's the plan for Abraj Kudai, a complex in Mecca, Saudi Arabia, that's set to become the world's largest hotel by room count when it opens in 2017.

http://www.cnn.com/videos/travel/2015/05/23/orig-pkg-worlds-largest-hotel-mecca-abraj-kudai.cnn
« Last Edit: June 17, 2015, 12:19:47 AM by Twisting H »

Twisting H

  • I dream in graph paper lines
  • ****
  • Posts: 384
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #27 on: July 04, 2015, 01:55:03 AM »
This might be useful for Ruin

From CNN, the go to for all my architecture related links evidently:

We mustn't forget the deep emotional impact of the buildings around us

http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/30/architecture/daniel-libeskind-architecture-emotions/

Quote
Editor's note: Architect Daniel Libeskind is CNN Style's first guest editor. He's commissioning a series of features that explore the theme of "Architecture and Emotion," to be published throughout July. Here, he explains some of the thoughts behind his chosen subject.

Architecture in Game Design from Rock Paper Shotgun, also a series.

A Psychogeography Of Games #1: Kentucky Route Zero

http://www.rockpapershotgun.com/2015/07/03/a-psychogeography-of-games-1-kentucky-route-zero/

Quote
This article is a part of a series based on 6 months as resident speaker at VideoBrains called A Psychogeography of Games. Psychogeography is a big chewy word put together by drunk French dudes in 1955 to talk about how the landscape of our lives affects how we feel, think and act. Here, I’m particularly interested in how the geography of our lives affects how we make games – the psychogeography of our games. So, in 2015, I’m going on a series of walks with some of my favourite game designers, in places that have affected how they think about what they make, and turning these into talks and articles.

Iafhtagn

  • Slayer of the Dread Gazebo
  • *
  • Posts: 18
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #28 on: July 05, 2015, 12:15:20 AM »
Brutalist playgrounds because what could be more playful than concrete?
http://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2015/jun/09/britains-brutalist-playgrounds-in-pictures

I'm pretty sure I would have loved playgrounds like that as a kid. At least the real concrete ones, not the foam thing at the end.

pigsinspaces

  • Slayer of the Dread Gazebo
  • *
  • Posts: 23
    • View Profile
Re: Freaky Architectural Stuff for Ruin
« Reply #29 on: July 17, 2015, 07:25:06 PM »
Not so freaky but interesting (and with a twist could be made freaky) are the ideal factory towns made by various chocolate manufacturers to maintain their workforce (usually inspired by the factory owners religious convictions) ... read a little intro at http://www.ediblegeography.com/the-towns-that-chocolate-built/


... you could look into the New Towns Act, under which brand new settlements were built in post-war UK (Milton Keynes etc) ... Livingston in Scotland was (I seem to recall) initially filled with people from slums in Glasgow and Edinburgh (a potentially explosive combination). See https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_towns_in_the_United_Kingdom for some info.